Wednesday, 12 April 2017

Edward Lear - part 11


Edward Lear (1812  - 1888) was an English artist, illustrator, musician, author and poet, and is known now mostly for his literary nonsense in poetry and prose and especially his limericks, a form he popularised. His principal areas of work as an artist were threefold: as a draughtsman employed to illustrate birds and animals; making coloured drawings during his journeys, which he reworked later, sometimes as plates for his travel books; as an illustrator of Alfred Tennyson's poems. As an author, he is known principally for his popular nonsense collections of poems, songs, short stories, botanical drawings, recipes, and alphabets. He also composed and published twelve musical settings of Tennyson's poetry.

For a full biography see part 1, and for earlier works see parts 1 - 10 also.

This is part 11 of 21- part series on the works of Edward Lear.

1858-1859 The Middle East:

1858 ( Dead Sea? )
watercolour and sepia ink over graphite on cream paper 15.4 x 25.1 cm
Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University

1858 Beirut
watercolour, sepia ink and Chinese white over graphite on blue paper 35.7 x 53.7 cm
Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University

1858 Cedars of Lebanon
watercolour on paper 35.5 x 54.6 cm
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

1858-66 Cedars of Lebanon
pencil 18.5 x 19.6 cm
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London


1858 Deir mar sabbas
pen and brown ink, watercolour wash over graphite 35.2 x 50.3 cm
Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

1858 Jerusalem
watercolour, sepia ink and Chinese white over graphite on blue paper 19.5 x 30.5 cm
Houghton Library, Harvard College Library, Harvard University

1858 Masada ( or Sebbeh ) on the Dead Sea
oil on canvas 47.6 x 76.2 cm
de Young / Legion of Honour Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, CA

1858 Masada
pen and brown ink and watercolour touched with white 17.5 x 25.1 cm
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

1858 Near Jericho
pen and brown ink over pencil, watercolour and gouache touched with white 13.9 x 25.1 cm
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

1858 Petra ( Jordan )
pen and brown ink over pencil, watercolour heightened with white 36.6 x 54.4 cm
© Victoria and Albert Museum, London

1858 Petra
pen and brown ink with watercolour 34 x 25 cm

1858 Pompey’s Pillar
graphite, ink and watercolour on paper Tate, London

1858 The Dead Sea
oil on canvas 24.5 x 38 cm
Dublin City Gallery, Ireland

1858 The Gorge at Suk Wady Barada, Lebanon
pen and brown ink and watercolour over pencil, on grey paper 36.5 x 52.5 cm

1858-1862 ( dated twice ) Baalbek, Lebanon
watercolour 18 x 37 cm

1858c The Dead Sea, Jordan
watercolour and body-colour, heightened with white 17.7 x 37.5 cm

1858c The Valley of Jehosaphat with Jerusalem Beyond
watercolour and body-colour 9.5 x 19.5 cm

1859 Jerusalem looking North West
oil on canvas 47 x 75.5 cm

1859 Petra
oil on canvas 91 x 147 cm

1859 San Sabbas
pen and ink and sepia wash 20.5 x 30.5 cm

1861 A Book of Nonsense 3rd edition 
Original drawings in Harvard College Library:





There was an old man with a beard


There was a young lady of Ryde


There was an old man with a nose


There was an old man on a hill


There was a young lady whose bonnet


There was a young person of Smyrna


There was an old man of Chile


There was an old man with a gong


There was a young lady of Chertsey


There was an old man in a tree


There was an old man with a flute


There was a young lady whose chin


There was an old man in a boat


There was a young lady of Portugal


There was an old person of Leeds


There was a young person of Crete


There was an old man who supposed


There was an old person whose habits


There was an old person of Dover


There was an old person of Basing


There was an old person of Philae


There was an old man with a poker


There was an old person of Mold


There was a young lady of Lucca


There was an old person of Cromer


There was an old person of Tring


There was an old man on some rocks


There was an old man who said, "How,


There was an old man of Whitehaven

There was an old person of Dutton

There was an old man who said, "Hush! -


There was an old person of Bangor


There was an old person of Anerley


There was an old person of Spain


There was an old man who said, "Well!


There was an old man with an owl


There was an old man at a Casement


There was an old man of Aôsta

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